Reviews

Entrance

Coming soon!

Cast:

Suziey Block as Suziey

Karen Gorham as Karen

Joshua Grote as Josh

Directed by Dallas Richard Hallam & Patrick Horvath

Review:

Entrance begins with a very slow-paced depiction of its lead character Suziey’s life in the Silverlake area of Los Angeles: no car, a soulless job at a coffee house and general alienation.

Actually, it’s not exactly fair to say the film begins with a slow-paced depiction of Suziey’s life because this display takes up the vast majority of the film. The film moves into “home invasion” territory at the end when a masked psychopath with a connection to Suziey’s past very violently crashes a dinner party attended by Suziey and her friends.

What the directing duo of Hallam and Horvath clearly intended here was a slow, character-oriented build-up and that’s where the ball was dropped on this film in a very big way. These long portions of the film are quite frankly very dull and do nothing to establish interesting characters, onscreen tension or a growing sense of unease, all of which would be necessary for the film to have its intended effect.

By the time the homicidal character shows up, it’s incredibly difficult to care. Not only that but this climactic sequence is further marred by some sloppily executed murder scene choreography and less-than-stellar bloody wound effects.

However, the filmmakers get big points for the memorable and disturbing closing shot of the film, which is the most effective moment in Entrance by leaps and bounds. The problem is that a lot of viewers are going to have real trouble making it that far.

Overall, based on the very long, fumbled build-up, Entrance comes off as a short film that’s been padded out to feature length.

There’s not enough compelling story material to sustain a full feature-length running time. What makes this all the more frustrating in the case of Entrance is the fact that there were two directors and four credited screenwriters on the film (including directors Hallam and Horvath) and this basic observation seems to have completely eluded this large creative team.